Sunday, January 20, 2008

Tomato Sauce

I know a lot of people have their special tomato sauce recipe that their grandmother brought from Italy, so I wanted to throw out tomato sauce according to the classical French regime.
Here's the ingredients:
1 quart diced tomato (i'm using canned because tomatoes are out of season)
8 oz tomato puree (canned as well)
16 oz chicken stock
Sugar
Ground pepper
Salt
Carrot
Onion
Bacon
Sachet:
1 bay leaf
2 cloves garlic
sprig rosemary
sprig thyme
5-6 peppercorns
And 8 oz of pig's feet

I didn't have any string to tie off my cheesecloth sachet bag, so I'm using a tea infuser.












Dice the bacon.













Medium dice the onion and carrot.













Render the bacon (melt the fat) without browning it.


























Next, sweat the onion and carrot in the bacon fat. (Sweating is just the process of sauteing vegetables until they are tender, and begin to release their juices.)










I'm doing this over medium-low heat.













The vegetables will look pretty loose when they're ready, and you don't want to brown them.












Add the diced tomato,












and tomato puree.














Next, add the pig's feet, the sachet,













and the chicken stock.













You might need to add more if the consistency is too thick, because it will thicken as you cook it.












Now, bring up to a boil, and down to a simmer.













Simmer for about 45 minutes to an hour.



























You know it's done when the carrots are completely cooked through; i.e. soft.













When it's done cooking, remove the pig's feet and the sachet,












and run the sauce through a food mill, food processor, or a blender. You could use an immersion blender if you have one.












Season to taste; salt to enhance flavor, pepper for spice, and sugar to balance the bitterness you may get from the tomatoes.













Tomato sauce is one of the five "mother sauces". The other four are Bechamel Sauce, Veloute sauce, Brown sauce, and Hollandaise Sauce.

It's called a "mother sauce" because from these mother sauces you can create an endless number of "daughter sauces." Daughter sauces are sauces that add ingredients to a "mother sauce." For example, for Portuguese Sauce, you sweat onion and garlic in clarified butter, and then add tomato concasse (roughly chopped tomato) and the pre-made tomato sauce.

Spanish sauce is tomato sauce with sliced mushrooms and sliced olives (Spanish omelet anyone?)

2 comments:

Crystal said...

What can I use instead of pig tootsies?

max said...

Do they sell chicken and other stocks in stores? Is it possible to substitute other things for stocks if you cannot acquire or produce them yourself? Or is the easy way out not possible?